Twitching at Bedtime? Here’s Why- And How to Sleep Better

Twitching at night–it’s something few of us talk about, yet it’s also a phenomenon that impacts Kiwis when it comes to sleep quality.  Today we will be discussing twitching while sleeping by telling you the underlying common causes, and what to do to sleep better on your luxury bed mattress more soundly at night.


(Image courtesy – freepik. com)

Is Twitching at Night Dangerous?

Casual twitching at night is nothing to worry about, but regular muscle spasms may point to different health conditions. Experiencing twitching in your sleep on your luxury mattress can cause an increase in wakefulness and a decline in sleep quality.

What Causes Twitching at Night?

The surprising part is, for many of us, that we don’t understand why we’re twitching while we’re sleeping, and that twitching can make it harder to sleep through the night.

Nutrient Deficiencies:

Nutrition is essential for sleeping well, but even normal functions during the day. And if you’re twitching daytime and nighttime, you could be deficient in Vitamin D, Vitamin B12, or an imbalance of Calcium.

Anxiety and Stress:

If you’re experiencing twitching only at night, however, chances are there’s another cause. Twitching at nighttime, often referred to as hypnic jerks, may be caused by chronic stress and anxiety

Exercising Too Late:

Exercise is essential for our overall health and even our sleep; regular exercise helps regulate sleep-wake cycles, our mood, and helps us live our healthiest lives possible. Avoid exercising right before bed, especially intense exercise, could at least worsen twitching while sleeping.

What to do in a severe case?

Get Assessed by a Sleep Specialist

If you’ve tried everything above, you must get assessed by a sleep specialist for sleep disorders like restless leg syndrome. While there’s still not a lot we know about restless leg syndrome, some treatments include addressing a vitamin and iron deficiency; using muscle relaxants and sleep aids.

(Image courtesy – freepik. com)

If you’re experiencing the occasional twitching at night or on a regular basis, the good news is that it’s almost always not a serious, and highly treatable condition. With these sleep twitching tips, now you know how to finally relax and sleep better.

Source Links; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
/pmc/articles/PMC4481805/

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Tired? Take a look at the vitamins and minerals your body can help you sleep better

Not sleeping well is awful, so here are 8 vitamin & mineral remedies that could help you get some shut-eye.

1. Vitamin D

Many of us know Vitamin D for its vital role in bone health. It also helps in regulating mood swings, supporting immune function, and helping in controlling inflammation. Many types of research have shown that Vitamin D deficiency is linked with sleep disorders, and low levels of Vitamin D increase the risk of a sleeping disorder. It can be really hard to get this vitamin from food, if you aren’t getting enough Vitamin D you can take a fat-soluble Vitamin D pill to get your daily dose.

2. Melatonin

A naturally produced hormone in the body, melatonin helps determine wake and sleep cycle patterns. Bright Light affects its production, with levels normally rising in the evening, remaining high during the night, and dropping in the early morning.

Small amounts of melatonin are found in fruit, grains, meat, and vegetables. It’s also available as a supplement, used to treat insomnia and jet lag. The body naturally produces melatonin, but factors like bright lights or even diet can reduce the production of melatonin in your body and make it harder to sleep at night. There are many ways to naturally boost levels of melatonin, like eating melatonin-rich foods like walnuts, goji berries, or pineapple, reducing exposure to blue light, or trying relaxation techniques that potentially boost levels of melatonin.

3. Iron

Iron deficiency can lead to restless leg syndrome, where people feel they constantly have to move their legs when they go to their new mattress, making it hard to fall asleep. Iron-deficient women tend to have more problems sleeping.

Iron-rich foods include dark chocolate, nuts, liver,  beef, lamb, beans, whole grains, and dark leafy green vegetables, or you can also buy iron tablets after consulting your doctor.

4. Calcium

Calcium is known for strengthening teeth and bones. It also helps the brain use the amino acid tryptophan to manufacture melatonin, which helps in inducing sleep on your new mattress. This is why a glass of warm milk is thought to help you get to sleep, as dairy products contain both calcium and tryptophan. You can also take calcium tablets after consulting your doctor

5. Magnesium

Magnesium is known for its ability to relieve insomnia, magnesium helps you release tension and relax, preparing you for sleep. One study found the mineral, which can be found in foods including dark leafy greens, nuts, seeds, fish, beans, and whole grains, helps decrease the stress hormone cortisol that can keep you awake.

6. Vitamin E

This antioxidant helps combat restless leg syndrome, thus making it easier for sufferers to fall asleep. Studies have also shown it can help relieve hot flushes and night sweats for menopausal women and improve sleep quality. It’s found in many foods, including dark leafy greens, nuts, seeds, fish, and fruit.

7. B vitamins

Research suggests good levels of vitamins B3, B5, B6, B9, and B12 may help achieve good sleep, as they help regulate the body’s level of the amino acid tryptophan, which helps the body produce sleep-inducing melatonin.

B vitamins are found in many foods, including fortified foods.

Studies Source Links:

https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10101354

Cuciureanu, M.D., Vink, R. Magnesium and stress. In: Vink, R., Nechifor, M., editors.(2011) Magnesium in the Central Nervous System. Adelaide (AU): University of Adelaide Press.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23992533/

 Sleep symptoms associated with intake of specific dietary nutrients

https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10101395

Grandner, M. A., Jackson, N., Gerstner, J. R., & Knutson, K. L. (2014). Sleep symptoms associated with intake of specific dietary nutrients. Journal of sleep research, 23(1), 22–34. https://doi.org/10.1111/jsr.12084

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Can the quality of your sleep influence the severity and frequency of your migraines?

Migraines are far more than just a bad headache. As well as causing intense pain, migraines can also lead to nausea, sensitivity to light and sound, and even vomiting. Migraines affect around one in every five women and one in every 15 men.

We’re going to take a closer look at this debilitating health condition, as well as exploring any potential relationship between migraines and our sleep habits.

Understanding migraines and sleep disturbances

Despite their prevalence in the general population, there is still a lot of mystery about what specifically causes migraines. They begin when hyperactive nerve cells send out impulses to blood vessels, causing them to constrict and expand. This results in a release of inflammatory substances that cause painful pulsations.

And studies have shown that there may be links to the chances of developing migraines. One study – published in the journal Headache – conducted a detailed sleep interview with 147 women who suffered from migraines. When asked if they felt refreshed or tired on waking, more than 80% said they felt tired and no one reported feeling refreshed. Complaints of sleep problems were extremely common among women.

Another study – also published in Headache – offered behavioral sleep instructions to 43 women with migraines. At the end of the study, participants who followed these instructions reported a significant reduction in headache frequency and intensity.

Can sleep problems cause migraines?

During a good night’s sleep, the average person will go through around six sleep cycles, each with four key stages of sleep – as well as rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. The deepest stages of this sleep cycle (stages three and four) are responsible for producing sufficient levels of serotonin and dopamine.

These neurotransmitters are known as ‘feel-good’ chemicals. Both of them depend on adequate sleep and vice versa. A drop in serotonin levels is linked to mental health concerns like anxiety and depression, as well as sleep problems.

Meanwhile, REM sleep is most powerful just before waking. Sleep problems can trigger migraines by causing instability of serotonin and dopamine levels. These kinds of chemical imbalances are widely associated with both poor sleep and regular migraines.

Can improving your sleep habits stop your migraines?

There are key signs associated with chronic sleep problems, which include: having a headache when you wake up; feeling scattered aches and pains; feeling fatigued and tired; having a low mood; feeling irritable and impatient; struggling to concentrate and remember things, and struggling to maintain social harmony with family and friends.

Because there is still a lot of mystery surrounding migraines, no one can say for sure whether better sleep habits will result in fewer migraines. However, the research suggests that it could, and positive sleep habits are vital for maintaining your overall health and wellbeing. This is because many of the triggers associated with migraines – such as anxiety and stress – can be eased through restorative sleep.

If you are a migraine sufferer and want to dedicate efforts towards improving sleep, there are some popular techniques you can utilize. Try keeping track of your sleep habits and migraine patterns each morning for at least four weeks by using a sleep diary, writing down how you slept and how you feel. When you review these entries, you may notice a pattern emerging that will give you an idea of what is triggering your migraines, and whether sleep has anything to do with it. If so, you can start making positive changes to improve your symptoms.

How to achieve better sleep

Evaluating your lifestyle and sleep habits can help you promote a better night’s sleep for your own health and wellbeing. Give yourself a fighting chance at a good night’s sleep by avoiding bright screens in the run-up to bedtime, including your smartphone. Instead, try reading or meditating, and be sure to keep your bedroom cool and dark.

What and when you eat can also play a role in your sleep. Cut down your caffeine intake, particularly in the evening, and try to eat dinner at least three hours before you get into bed. You should also begin exercising regularly, ideally in the morning or afternoon rather than in the evening.

By putting these simple changes into practice, you can enjoy better sleep quality in the long run. This will help to improve your health overall, and may even work to reduce the severity and frequency of your migraine attacks.

A high-quality luxury mattress is a vital component of any good night’s sleep, which is why Slumberzone luxury mattresses are specifically engineered to improve your sleep quality. Explore our range of premium mattresses on our website today, or check out the rest of our blogs for more sleep tips and guidance.

Reference Links :

https://headachejournal.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1526-4610.2006.00410.x

https://www.sleepadvisor.org/sleep-and-migraines/

https://www.healthline.com/health/migraine/how-to-manage-sleep-related-fatigue-with-migraine

  • Note:- Please consult your physician on migraines/headaches and sleep disorders.
  • The above blog is general information and based on reference published information available online
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Which Mattress Should You Choose?

If you need help choosing the right mattress, this handy little infographic by Slumberzone might help you with making the right decision.

Slumberzone Luxury Bed & Mattress manufacturers in  New Zealand have devised this handy little infographic to give you all the information you could possibly need when it comes to buying your next mattress. With so many different styles and variations to consider it can seem like an impossible choice, but by following the information set on in this graphic you’re sure to find the perfect size and style for your needs.

  • Right-click and save this infographic on your PC / Laptop
  • Save it on your smartphone to share with your friends in New Zealand

Source : www.sleepcouncil.org.uk

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Does Better sleeping habits lead to better college grades ?

Top MIT professors have concluded a research of a strong relationship between academic grades of students and how much good sleep they’re getting. The time when students sleep and the consistency of their sleep routine & habits also make a great difference. Just getting a good night’s sleep just before a big test is not good enough — it takes several nights of consistent & good sleep to make a major difference.

Quality of sleep also mattered, not just quantity. For example, those who got relatively consistent amounts of sleep each night did better than those who had greater variations from one night to the next, even if they ended up with the same average amount.

These research professors conducted a study to see if there was a relationship between the amount of sleep students get and their grades. The study, which experimented with 100 students in an MIT engineering class, did find a strong relationship between the two.

The students’ sleep habit consistency, and the time they went to bed, both made a difference as well. The professors also found that it takes a few nights of quality sleep to make a difference. In other words, you can’t just get a good night’s sleep the night before a test and expect it to be enough.

The students were provided with Fitbits in exchange for providing the professors with their activity data for a full semester. The findings, some unexpected and some not surprising, were reported in the journal Science of Learning.

One of the strongest academic success predictors for college students is the amount of sleep they get. Sleep plays a significant role in fixing and consolidating memories, and prevents decay of memories. When you don’t have sleep, you end up having to work harder, but still not do as well.

There has been previous research which found a link between academic performance and sleep. However, this research relied solely on the students filling out sleep diaries.

Three Important Measures

The students who obtained the best quality of sleep, the most sleep, and the most consistent sleep, experienced better grades than the students who obtained the least sleep. Grade scores overall were determined by adding their scores on:
●      Three midterms
●      Eleven quizzes
●      One final exam

The three sleep measures (quality, duration, consistency) together made up 25% of the variances in overall grade performance of the students.

The research also found for good academic performance, there’s a cut-off bedtime, which is 2 AM. Those who stayed up past this cut-off time, experienced poorer academic performance, even when their total sleep time is the same as their peers who went to bed earlier.

Therefore, this means the time you go to bed seems to matter. If you get a certain amount of sleep, like 8 hours, no matter what time you get that sleep, your performance is the same, as long as you go to bed before a certain time (10 PM, 12 AM 1 AM). However, your performance begins to go down despite sleeping for 8 hours, if you go to bed after 2 AM. This means quantity isn’t everything. In the study, however, quality of sleep mattered. Those students who were consistent with how much sleep they obtained every night, performed better in their class than those students who had irregular sleep patterns, even if they wound up with fairly the same amount of sleep on average.

Another study showed pushing school start times back was associated with a substantial effect on grades. The researchers of this study looked at the effect delaying school time hours by 1 hour had on student grades. They found a 34 minute increase of average daily sleep increased students’ grades by 4.5%, along with their attendance. Also found is a lack of sleep among teens was associated with depression and low mood.

Source Links:

https://www.minnpost.com/second-opinion/2019/10/study-regularly-getting-a-good-nights-sleep-is-linked-to-better-test-scores-and-grades-in-college/

http://news.mit.edu/2019/better-sleep-better-grades-1001

https://advances.sciencemag.org/content/4/12/eaau6200

https://www.sleepfoundation.org/articles/teens-and-sleep

The above information has been prepared by a researchers and may not represent the practices followed universally.

The information provided on this website is not intended nor is implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. Always seek correct advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare provider in New Zealand with any questions you may have regarding sleep training, problems or any other medical condition or the health and welfare of your & your loved ones.

 The advice you receive from Slumberzone New Zealand is for informational purposes only*

 

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What are the advantages of cooling gel memory foam?

Sleeping at the right temperature is important. Not only does this impact the restfulness of your night’s sleep, but by adding cooling gel memory foam to a mattress, we can dramatically increase the recovery you experience throughout the night.

Human beings generally experience the best rest and recovery between 16-22 degrees centigrade. While turning the temperature down and casting the blanket aside can help reduce heat on the top half of the body, the other half is still in contact with the mattress. Without temperature regulation in this half, there can be a significant decrease in comfort and restfulness.

What is Cooling Gel Memory Foam?

Cooling gel memory foam is a specially-formulated memory foam that contains gel beads designed to help absorb heat and draw it away from the sleeper. Additionally, the cellular structure of the memory foam itself is optimized for increased airflow over traditional formulations.

This cooling layer tops in Slumberzone Luxury mattress helps control sleep temperatures but also provides a supple, supportive cushion especially to areas that are often under-supported like the lower back and side.

By increasing the vital flow of air, and reducing the overall sleep temperatures by actively pulling away from the heat from the body, cooling gel memory foam helps deliver the ideal sleep environment.

Orthocool™ Gel memory foam mattress and luxury pillows help in relieving pressure points, providing support where it’s needed. Our cooling gel foam will work through the night to correctly align your spine reducing the risk of back pain. If partner disturbance is a problem, Orthocool™ Gel Memory foam mattress by Slumberzone New Zealand will isolate motion transfer so one of you can get in or out of bed without disturbing the other

Cooling gel memory foam helps form a great sleep environment. So, no mattress how much time you spend on a Slumberzone luxury mattress, the time you spend on it is the most refreshed, restful, and restorative.

Why is sleeping cool important?

Slumberzone Beds are designed and built to the highest standards. With an eye to developing the best quality beds, we also believe that one of life’s greatest pleasures is a restful, luxurious, comfortable night’s sleep. The Hibrido luxury bed comes together with the pure benefits of the legendary “Intelliprings” Spring System, the revolutionary Orthocool Gel® Memory Foam, Natural Latex, and Soft touch luxurious Silk Floss Quilting

Cool sleep helps regulate metabolism and ensures your body is able to provide the best recovery possible. Want to learn more? Visit Slumberzone New Zealand website to know more about

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Common Sleep Problems & Remedies For Senior Citizens

Some Common Sleep problems Our New Zealander Seniors Citizens Are Facing:

1. Insomnia

Insomnia is defined as the inability to obtain restorative sleep each night, or habitual sleeplessness.

The National Institutes of Health reported that in one study more than 50 percent of older adults said they had trouble falling asleep or staying asleep. Common symptoms linked with insomnia that the elderly experience are:

  • Taking a minimum of 35-40 minutes to fall asleep
  • Waking up at an early hour, and not being able to fall back to sleep
  • Waking up on multiple occasions in the middle of the night
  • Feeling unproductive and exhausted the following day

Initial insomnia symptoms are referred to as “short-term insomnia.” Physicians will typically diagnose individuals with “chronic insomnia” if they have persistent symptoms for over a month; often, secondary insomnia will persist even after the initial root cause is treated.

2. Sleep-Disordered Breathing

Snoring and sleep apnea are two examples of a sleep-disordered condition. These conditions make it harder to breathe while sleeping on your luxury mattress. When severe, they might cause you to wake up during the night often, and be drowsy during the day.

Snoring is an extremely common condition that affects almost 40 percent of adults. It’s more common in older individuals and those who are overweight. Snoring, when severe, doesn’t just cause frequent nighttime awakenings and daytime sleepiness, but it could also disrupt your partner’s sleep.

A partial airway passage blockage from your nose to mouth to lungs causes snoring. This blockage causes your passage tissues to vibrate, which leads to the noise you hear when a person snores.

Sleep apnea comes in two types:

  • Obstructive sleep apnea: A condition that occurs when you have air that enters from your mouth or nose that’s completely or partially blocked, typically due to extra tissue in the back of your mouth and throat, or because of obesity. These episodes could cause you to awaken often throughout the night if they’re frequent or severe. They can make you sleepy during the day.
  • Central sleep apnea: This condition isn’t as common. It occurs when your brain isn’t sending the right signals to begin the breathing process.

In many cases, both sleep apnea types can occur in the same individual.

Obstructive sleep apnea could increase your risk for:

  • Stroke
  • High blood pressure
  • Cognitive problems
  • Heart disease

But, there needs to be more research to understand obstructive sleep apena’s long-term consequences in older adults.

3. Poor Sleep Environment and Sleep Habits

These include consumption of alcohol before bedtime, irregular sleep hours, and falling asleep with the television on. Make sure your bedroom is dark, quiet, and comfortable, and your bedtime ritual conducive to sleep.

4. Stress

Significant life changes like the death of a loved one, moving from a family home, and retirement can cause stress. Stress can impact how you sleep.

Tips for Sleeping Better as You Age

Here are some tips you can follow to help you sleep better.

  1. Improve Sleep Habits

Often, you could improve your sleep simply by:

  • Improving your sleep environment
  • Addressing emotional problems
  • Choosing healthier daytime habits.

Because each person is different, it could take some experimentation to see what will work best for improving your sleep.

  1. Take a Warm Bath

Your body temperature drops when you get out of a warm bath, which could help you become drowsy. It could also help you slow down and relax, making you more ready for bedtime.

  1. Avoid Afternoon Naps

If you take naps during the day, it could leave you lying awake at night. If you do decide to nap, try to keep them short, or about 20-30 minutes long.

4. Sleep on a Supportive Mattress

Sleep on a supportive luxury mattress like a Slumberzone mattress, or even a Slumberzone mattress topper. Natural latex foam mattresses offer older adults the benefits of memory foam in New Zealand, but without the drawbacks of them. Latex provides the contouring and “hug” of memory foam without sleeping hot. It provides outstanding pressure point relief if you’re experiencing achy joints and muscles. It practically eliminates motion transfer, and provides temperature regulation and natural bounciness.

A natural latex foam mattress is a great alternative to traditional mattresses, and the best mattress for older people in New Zealand.

They provide more spring to them than does memory foam, and instantly recover their shape when you change body positions.

Another alternative, and a more cost-effective way of enjoying the luxury of natural latex, is a natural latex luxury mattress by Slumberzone New Zealand.

5. Treat your Sleep Disorder

Based on your sleep assessment, your sleep specialist or doctor might recommend specific treatment options. It’s important you remember there are effective sleep disorder treatments that could help ease your symptoms, and help you sleep better.

Slumberzone Research Takeaway

To determine if you’re having issues with sleep, take a look at the quality of your time awake. When younger, if you were getting less sleep, but you still felt energetic and rested during the day, it could just be you’re now requiring less sleep. Each individual’s sleep requirements are different.

But, if you’re noticing your lack of sleep has an impact on your daytime activities, you should look further into the cause of your sleeplessness, and see a doctor to learn the steps of getting better sleep.

Disclaimer – We recommend you consult your physicians or certified medical authority to understand solve your sleep problems. The above is a general read and guide on common sleep disorders and the remedies.

References

  1. https://www.healthnavigator.org.nz/health-topics/sleep/
  2. https://www.nccih.nih.gov/health/sleep-disorders-in-depth
  3. https://www.health.govt.nz/your-health/conditions-and-treatments/diseases-and-illnesses/sleep-problems
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HOW CAN YOU PRIORITIZE SLEEP IN THE NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTIONS?

 

It’s that time of year again!  We are emerging from the post-holiday bliss/exhaustion/food withdrawal and we are turning our souls into a fresh New Year.  There is something about the New Year that has us all craving a fresh start.  Many of us are thinking about what we want to achieve and how we can improve our lives to be happier, healthier and more fulfilled.  Christmas lists are quickly replaced by lists of New Year’s Resolutions.   Look at your 2020 resolutions a little differently and instead of the most common resolutions, you replace them with one New Year’s Sleep Resolution: PRIORITIZE SLEEP!

OPTIMIZE YOUR SLEEP ENVIRONMENT

  • Your bedroom should be solely for sleep and sex
  • Create a sleep haven – cool, dark, white noise, soft sheets
  • Take out the TV and any electronics.

Remove any blue or white light sources

DEVELOP A CONSISTENT BEDTIME ROUTINE

  • Just like our kiddos, we need a consistent bedtime routine that helps to relax us and tells our body that we are getting ready for sleep
  • A bath or a shower can be relaxing
  • Opt to read a book instead of Netflix and Instagram
  • If your mind is busy, keep a journal by the side of the bed to jot your thoughts down

ESTABLISH A CONSISTENT BEDTIME & WAKE TIME

  • A daily consistent bedtime and wake up time is important for adults as it helps with our circadian rhythm, our internal sleep wake clock.
  • The most recommended way is to sleep every night and wake up at the same time every day. Even on the weekends! If you have little kids, waking at the same time every day shouldn’t be a problem!

HELP YOUR CHILDREN TO BE HEALTHY SLEEPERS

  • It should go without saying that if your children aren’t getting enough sleep, you are definitely *NOT* getting enough sleep!
  • Prioritizing how to help your child to be a better sleeper will in turn help you get the sleep you need and undoubtedly, you’ll show up more as the parent you want to be.
  • Our child’s disposition will be happier and therefore there will be less stress in your household.
  • If they aren’t waking at ungodly hours in the morning or fighting bedtime, you’ll have time and energy to fit in your workouts and to prepare healthier food choices.

  • In full transparency, I finished writing this at 11:45 pm – way past my bedtime!  Guess what my Top New Year’s Sleep Resolution is this year? Prioritizing sleep!  Hopefully it will help me to take off the “baby weight” that has been hanging around for the past five years!
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Snoring Facts & Remedies

We’ve probably all had the experience of sleeping in the same room as someone who snores. You know how it is – worn out and drained from the day, you and your partner crawl into bed and turn off the lights. Whispered “Goodnight”s sound as you settle into the blankets. Then, as bad luck would have it, your partner falls asleep before you. As their rumbling snore seems enough to shake the bed, wake up the neighbors, and definitely rip you out of any dreamy state you might have been drifting into.

Who snores?

As the infographic shows, many, many people snore. Nearly everyone snores at least every now and then. According to a study, 60 % of sleepers reported that their bed partner snores regularly. Sometimes snoring can be indicative of certain respiratory disorders, but most often it’s nothing to worry about – just a bodily phenomenon that occurs in some people. While predominantly men are the culprits of this practice, it can also occur in women, especially among pregnant women. Reports show that many pregnant women snore in their third trimester.

Even though in 70% of cases snoring is shown to be hereditary, other factors may inhibit or intensify this. For example, obese people usually prove to be more prone to snoring, and it can also be caused by habits such as smoking and heavy drinking. Gulping down that cup of milk or serving yourself that delicious bowl of cereal before bed may contribute to your snoring as well, since research shows that consuming dairy before bed can be a causal factor. In addition, if you go to sleep anytime between the ages of 40 and 60 (which we hope you do), you may be more likely to snore.

 

What causes snoring?

On its most basic level, snoring is the result of having your air passages restricted. When we fall asleep, the muscles in our throats and tongues tend to relax, and sometimes they relax so much that they fill up the spaces in our airways. This, in turn, causes those all-too-well-known vibrations from the throat and nose. In the worst of cases, snoring can become something called Obstructive Sleep Apnea, and can correlate to sleep disruption, where you accidentally wake yourself up with your snoring. Understably, this causes daytime sleepiness. Obstructive Sleep Apnea can also correlate to high blood pressure.

What can you do to reduce snoring?

As previously discussed, the consumption of certain foods can be the cause of snoring. Limiting yourself on these items may help you reduce snoring and help those around you sleep better. Also, losing excessive weight causes to be a big factor in improving your ability to breathe easily as you sleep. Even though you might be more prone to snoring as you age or when you get pregnant, there are other little things you can do as well. Since gravity pushing down on your uvula, tongue and soft palate can be what’s causing you to snore, you may find that sleeping on your side solves the problem. Furthermore, the shape and density of your luxury pillow may play a role in how you breathe when you sleep, so you may consider experimenting with that to see if it yields better results.

 

 

 

At Slumberzone beds NZ we have certain beds and products that aid with snoring and other similar struggles, and in this respect we can be more than just another New Zealand mattress store for you – we can consult with you to find long-term, lasting solutions. We’re here to help! Come in any time and one of our team members will be happy to direct you to the nearest solution.

 

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HEALTHY SLEEP ROUTINE FOR KIDS

Sleep is important year round, but during school times, when learning is so intense, it becomes even more important to develop healthy sleep habits and ensure our children are meeting their needs. Investing in a new luxury mattress in New Zealand is always a great option.

First, let’s start by reviewing the recommended amount of sleep for children and why achieving these recommendations is so important:

  • Infants 4 to 12 months – 14 to 15 hours every 24 hours (including naps)
  • Children 1 to 2 years – 12 to 14 hours every 24 hours (including naps)
  • Children 3 to 5 years – 11 to 13 hours every 24 hours (including naps)
  • Children 6 to 12 years – 10 to 11 hours every 24 hours
  • Teens 13 to 18 years – 9 to 10 hours every 24 hours

Children who get sufficient sleep at night and for naps (if needed) on a regular basis, see many benefits.  The benefits can include improved attention span, learning, memory, behavior, emotional regulation and overall quality of life.  It’s clear to see how these benefits will help our children at school and at home alike.

 

Consider These Slumberzone Tips Below To Help Your Kiddos Meet Their Sleep Needs:

TIP #1 – ADJUST THE SLEEP SCHEDULE

At least one week before school starts, re-establish your school schedule.  This means waking children up at the time they will need to awaken once school starts.  This will help them transition their entire day to be in line with their school schedule and will also make it easier to move to earlier bedtimes.

TIP #2 – EARLIER BEDTIMES

Introduce earlier bedtimes to ensure your littles meet their sleep needs early in the night.  Bedtimes for school age children typically range in between 7:00 – 8:00.  Earlier bedtime makes it easier for children to drift off to slumber, can help to prevent the middle of the night wakings and ensure they are getting the most restorative sleep, which happens earlier in the night.

TIP #3 – CONSISTENT BEDTIME ROUTINE

Develop a consistent bedtime routine to help your children transition to sleepy time.  Children crave consistency and routine so having a consistent bedtime routine helps them to adjust from play to sleepy time.  A good routine lasts between 15-30 minutes, is not rushed and incorporates several soothing elements.  Consider a bath, then pajamas, cuddles and books.  Ensure that this is a calm time, with focus on connecting with your child, which may help prevent bedtime battles.

TIP #4 – CHILL OUT WITHOUT SCREENS BEFORE BED

Before you start your bedtime routine, quiet down the house.  One hour before bed, I recommend turning off the TV and tablets and engaging in quiet play/reading to begin transitioning your children from their busy school day into their soothing bedtime routine.  The blue light emitted from TVs and tablets can be stimulating and can delay melatonin production, therefore delaying the onset of sleep, which can negatively impact your children reaching their required sleep needs.

TIP #5 – FIND BALANCE

As you are looking at all of the extracurricular activities that are available for your children, ensure that the choices you make to fill their time for enrichment also allow for enough time for them to complete their homework AND get adequate rest.  The key is balance between learning, fun and sleep!

 

Bonus Tip: If your kid is struggling while studying or fall asleep in middle of class. Maybe your kid is suffering from narcolepsy. Narcolepsy is a rare chronic neurological disorder that affects the brain’s ability to control sleep-wake cycles.
Here is the Infographic on “Studying with Narcolepsy- 15 tips for successful learning”.
Credits: James Corbyn
Article Link: https://ivypanda.com/blog/studying-with-narcolepsy/

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